WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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What are these little bushy plants?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-17T20:47:38.272-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Helianthemum canadense
Wow, this is a very nice, old individual of Canada rockrose (aka longbranch frostweed), a native plant from rockrose family (Cistaceae). The more recently used Latin name is Crocanthemum canadense. There is also some chance that this is another, more rare Crocanthemum. More detail is needed for a positive ID. I am guessing this is C. canadense, because this is by far the most common species. It produces beautiful golden flowers in spring, which are "normal" cross-pollinated flowers. They are solitary, each sitting at the tip of a branchlet. Later on, this flower/fruit finds itself at the origin of two new long, opposite shoots (forming a V-shape; hence the name longbranch frostweed). These new shoots produce flowers of a different type, which never open and are self-fertilized. These are also productive, although their fruits are smaller, having less seed. Such flowers are called cleistogamous (cleisto=hidden, gamous=mating).
Irina
(Fri Aug 18 04:50:02 PDT 2017)


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I hope this is one of the good guys!?

Location: JayeSt., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-17T20:51:28.684-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Ambrosia artemisiifolia
A weedy plant--common ragweed, which also has highly allergenic pollen. It's native here (invasive in SE Europe, where folks leave for vacation to avoid its flowering in August).
Irina
(Fri Aug 18 04:08:10 PDT 2017)


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How about this? I thought it was another autumn olive but its leaves are opposite and flat

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-17T20:30:24.725-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Lonicera morrowii
This is an alien honeysuckle, most probably the invasive Morrow's honeysuckle.
Irina
(Fri Aug 18 04:02:53 PDT 2017)


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What is this and is it native?

Location: Uplands, Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-12T13:27:51.634-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Jasione montana
The out-of-focus blue flower seems to be the new invasive plant from bellflower family, sheep's bit, but it looks like the leaves belong to something else.
Irina
(Sat Aug 12 14:45:57 PDT 2017)

Jasione montana
I figured out the leafy stems belong to horseweed (Erigeron canadense = Conyza canadensis). This is a native plant, although leggy, with tiny flowers, and thus generally not that pretty.
Irina
(Sun Aug 13 13:46:37 PDT 2017)

Jasione montana
You are correct! Turns out the little sheeps bit leaves were hidden down there.
Sandy F.
(Thu Aug 17 20:42:50 PDT 2017)


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What is this woody shrub?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-17T20:36:49.956-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:


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These are numerous; are they invasive?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-16T20:36:14.29-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Hieracium caespitosum
Yes, that's an invasive plant with a telling name "king-devil" (or meadow hawkweed).
Irina
(Thu Aug 17 05:22:04 PDT 2017)

Hieracium caespitosum
Thank you, this is so helpful. I'll remove them all.
Sandy F.
(Thu Aug 17 20:04:04 PDT 2017)


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Waterside Plant

Ignore the second sideways pic. This was on a lakeside in the Berkshires.

Location: Rowe, MA
Submitted by Neef
(2017-08-17T18:06:08.132-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Spiraea alba var. alba
Meadowsweet I think. Some of it can be still be flowering--we have a photo in flower dated Aug 20. In eastern MA we have var. latifolia, and var. alba is in the western part of the state. It used to be called Spiraea salicicfolia before. The axis of inflorescence is short tomentose in this var., and leaves are oblanceolate.
Irina
(Thu Aug 17 18:41:27 PDT 2017)


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I haven't the foggiest clue what this is

Short, waxy and pure white - stem as well as flower - growing out of thick humus on the floor of a small forest in perpetual shade. Sprouted in mid-June.

Location: North Andover, MA
Submitted by misschameleon
(2017-08-17T11:56:38.594-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Monotropa uniflora
Indian pipe, a normal flowering plant in all respects, except for lack of chlorophyll. Due to that deficiency, it cannot produce its own sugars and steals a little from neighbors by way of connecting its roots to fungus hyphas, which, in turn, connect to roots of other plants. The plant-fungus association is called mycorrhiza. It's all intricately connected underground!
Irina
(Thu Aug 17 12:28:39 PDT 2017)


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Is this a native pepper weed?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-16T20:06:50.497-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Lepidium virginicum
This is native: poorman's pepperweed.
Irina
(Thu Aug 17 05:16:33 PDT 2017)


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Is this a native serviceberry?

The second photo shows the bark; see the Y-shaped tree.

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-13T18:04:25.007-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Prunus serotina
Yes, it's native, but not serviceberry. This is black cherry. If you let it grow, it will develop into a large tree. I mean very large.
Irina
(Mon Aug 14 04:21:26 PDT 2017)

Prunus serotina
Oh, my! A host plant for beautiful cecropia moths!
Sandy F.
(Mon Aug 14 18:08:33 PDT 2017)

Prunus serotina
This moth is actually not specialized. Over here they list host plants, and there are some 25 different plants from rose family (where black cherry belongs) and 50+ from other families?including some non-native and even invasive plants, such as European barberry.
Irina
(Tue Aug 15 05:09:12 PDT 2017)

Prunus serotina
Neat! Beautiful photos of all stages.
Sandy F.
(Wed Aug 16 20:01:07 PDT 2017)


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