WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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can you identify this plant?

Location: Sharon, MA
Submitted by Karen
(2017-05-20T14:33:22.023-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Lysimachia quadrifolia
This is whorled loosestrife, a native plant. Leaves first appear dark red, especially when there is enough bright light, and in June it produces a few yellow flowers at each whorl.
Irina
(Sat May 20 16:24:30 PDT 2017)

Lysimachia quadrifolia
Thank you!
Karen
(Sat May 20 16:27:11 PDT 2017)


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Is this Viburnum lentago?

It's very stout and rather straight and taller than I would have expected. At the very edge of Fresh Pond; bark is kind of blocky, I have a pic of that too.

Location: Fresh Pond Cambridge
Submitted by Doug Roberson
(2017-05-17T09:26:38.183-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Viburnum lentago
Doug, it sure looks like sweet viburnum. This plant does surprise by its height: it is in fact the largest of the native viburnums. It can grow to 10 m and become a tree! Three characters help with identification: winged leaf petioles, very sharp teeth along leaf margins, and sessile inflorescences. As far as the resoultion allows us see, this plant seems to have all the three features.
Irina
(Wed May 17 10:06:41 PDT 2017)

Viburnum lentago
Thanks. I had to sake the pic thru a chain link fence surrounding the pond, because it's a public water supply.
Doug
(Wed May 17 15:19:15 PDT 2017)

Viburnum lentago
I am curious about the bark--never noticed it has special bark. Could you post that shot?
Irina
(Wed May 17 15:45:53 PDT 2017)


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What is this plant?

Location: Worcester MA
Submitted by Jenna H,
(2017-05-16T16:42:14.775-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Rhus typhina
Staghorn sumac with some fruits of last year
Irina
(Tue May 16 18:47:21 PDT 2017)


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Growing along edge of yard near forest

Location: Manchester township nj
Submitted by Pat
(2017-05-16T05:28:52.357-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Leucothoe fontanesiana
Drooping fetterbush or dog hobble (native in Ala., Ga., N.C., S.C., Tenn., Va.)
Irina
(Tue May 16 09:25:59 PDT 2017)


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plant id

Location: New Bedford 02745
Submitted by Francis Lecuyer
(2017-05-11T15:55:30.404-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Anchusa officinalis
Hi Fran! One thing that can be told with confidence is the family: Boraginaceae; but then leaves aren't shown. Maybe this is the plant called alkanet.
irina
(Thu May 11 18:10:31 PDT 2017)

Anchusa officinalis
Thank you Irina and have a grand Spring.
Francis Lecuyer
(Fri May 12 03:57:14 PDT 2017)


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What is this plant?

Location: Worcester, MA
Submitted by Abbey C.
(2017-05-05T08:53:27.005-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Malus floribunda
One more crab? They are actually invasive.
Irina
(Fri May 05 16:05:46 PDT 2017)


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Would you identify?

On a dry sand berm

Location: Robert F. Smith Cold Brook Preserve Harwich MA
Submitted by Doug Roberson
(2017-05-04T15:26:58.257-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Erodium cicutarium
This is stork's bill, an annual from Eurasia (geranium family). In some states it is invasive or noxious weed. In MA it does not yet seem to be a large problem.
irina
(Thu May 04 18:51:42 PDT 2017)


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What is this plant?

Location: Worcester, Ma
Submitted by Abbey C.
(2017-05-03T16:05:55.92-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Malus floribunda
Japanese crabapple I think.
Irina
(Thu May 04 18:44:19 PDT 2017)


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What plant is this!

Location: Plymouth Massachusetts
Submitted by Charissa
(2017-04-22T19:58:08.592-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Chimaphila maculata
This is striped pipsissewa. It has been overwintering green. The Latin name means winter (chima-) lover (-phila). It will flower in summer: will produce very pretty, nodding flowers looking as if porcelain.
Irina Kadis
(Sun Apr 23 04:31:09 PDT 2017)


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What tree is this? Bright yellow new spring growth

Only one of it's kind seen there. Thanks!

Location: Rochester, MA Eastover Farm
Submitted by linda scharf
(2017-04-10T11:45:14.774-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Cornus alternifolia
This could be alternate-leaved dogwood (whose more recent Latin name is Swida alternifolia). This dogwood is famous for producing bright to orangish-yellow twigs when infected by the fungus (Cryptodioporthe corni). In fact this reaction is so typical that it is often mentioned in identification keys--makes a good diagnostic character. When I enlarge your photo, I can see that twigs look wrinkled, as if dried out; also, I cannot spot a single bud, which makes me think the color is a reaction to fungus.
Irina
(Mon Apr 10 12:52:19 PDT 2017)


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