WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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What plant is this!

Location: Plymouth Massachusetts
Submitted by Charissa
(2017-04-22T19:58:08.592-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Chimaphila maculata
This is striped pipsissewa. It has been overwintering green. The Latin name means winter (chima-) lover (-phila). It will flower in summer: will produce very pretty, nodding flowers looking as if porcelain.
Irina Kadis
(Sun Apr 23 04:31:09 PDT 2017)


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What tree is this? Bright yellow new spring growth

Only one of it's kind seen there. Thanks!

Location: Rochester, MA Eastover Farm
Submitted by linda scharf
(2017-04-10T11:45:14.774-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Cornus alternifolia
This could be alternate-leaved dogwood (whose more recent Latin name is Swida alternifolia). This dogwood is famous for producing bright to orangish-yellow twigs when infected by the fungus (Cryptodioporthe corni). In fact this reaction is so typical that it is often mentioned in identification keys--makes a good diagnostic character. When I enlarge your photo, I can see that twigs look wrinkled, as if dried out; also, I cannot spot a single bud, which makes me think the color is a reaction to fungus.
Irina
(Mon Apr 10 12:52:19 PDT 2017)


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Can you identify these plants?

Location: North Dartmouth
Submitted by Hamm
(2017-01-08T15:19:23.031-08:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Utricularia vulgaris
Hamm, this is a bladderwort, most probably great bladderwort (its more recent Latin name is Utricularia macrorhiza). The resolution is low, and there are many bladderwort species around here, but I rely on yellow flowers (U. purpurea would be purple), the floating habit (another common yellow-flowered bladderwort, U. cornuta, would be rooted in the shore mud or sand), the absence of the floating device (such as in U. inflata or U. radiata), and also the fact that other yellow bladderworts are more rare. I am talking about the plant in the center. The one surrounding it is white water lily (Nymphaea odorata).
Irina
(Sun Jan 08 17:10:58 PST 2017)


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Can you identify these plants?

Location: North Dartmouth
Submitted by Hamm
(2017-01-08T15:19:23.031-08:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Ludwigia palustris
Water purslane
Irina
(Sun Jan 08 16:58:39 PST 2017)


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What is this plant?

A cluster of this plant was found not to far from the river bank of the Taunton River.

Location: Wildlands Trust - Great River Preserve in Bridgewater
Submitted by Bill Vickstrom
(2017-01-06T05:39:23.308-08:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Chimaphila maculata
Bill, that's spotted wintergreen or striped pipsessewa.
I
(Fri Jan 06 09:58:43 PST 2017)


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What is this plant?

This plant was found in a few clusters in land near one of the upper branches of the Eel River.

Location: Upper Eel River Plymouth
Submitted by Bill Vickstrom
(2017-01-03T07:11:58.399-08:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Juniperus horizontalis
Bill, it looks like some non-native juniper that escaped from plantings, maybe creeping juniper. Because of low resolution, it's hard to tell. I can also be some false Cyperess (Chamaecyparis). Do you have coordinates for the spot by any chance? We'd go take a look.
Irina
(Tue Jan 03 10:02:58 PST 2017)


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Is this invasive Autumn Olive?

Location: Hog Rock Rd. Plymouth
Submitted by Denise
(2016-11-01T17:54:17.508-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Elaeagnus umbellata
Yes, Denise, I agree with you.
Irina
(Wed Nov 02 03:58:02 PDT 2016)


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what is this?

Location: winchendon, massachusetts
Submitted by meg watkins
(2016-09-20T08:23:35.45-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Amaranthus sp.
This must be some amaranth.
Irina
(Fri Sep 30 18:23:20 PDT 2016)

Amaranthus sp.
Thank you Irina, I finally figured it out as well.
meg watkins
(Tue Oct 18 15:15:12 PDT 2016)


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What is this?

Location: Southwick, Ma
Submitted by Patty
(2016-10-13T16:23:11.451-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Vitis riparia
This is a grape, which seems to be riverbank grape. There are 3 native grapes in Massachusetts: fox, summer, and riverbank grape. The latter is native in western and central MA including Hampden Co. (where Southwick belongs), reaching east to Middlesex and Essex.
Irina
(Fri Oct 14 16:07:52 PDT 2016)

Vitis riparia
I decided this is riverbank grape, because I noticed pointed teeth on most leaves. Each tooth is somewhat asymmetric, with one side concave, which is a diagnostic character for this grape. The one leaf that you showed close-up is more lobed and not typical for this clone. There is always variation with grape leaves, but we should consider the "average" leaf when it comes to ID. Did you take your photos at some stream bank?
Irina
(Sat Oct 15 07:18:57 PDT 2016)


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What plant is this?

Needed for a project

Location: Essex County Massachusetts
Submitted by anonymous
(2016-09-26T07:49:35.779-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Bidens tripartita
This is beggarticks, most probably a non-native species, leafy-bracted beggartics, which was formerly called Bidens comosa and now B. tripartita. It is widespread in MA, except for the southeast (excluding Bristol, Plymouth County, and the Cape).
Irina
(Tue Sep 27 16:17:36 PDT 2016)


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