WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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More photos from previous post...

The site wasn't letting me load photos on my previous post, so these pics belong to that. This enormous monster was in a local park in Easton. Probably not native, but worth IDing because of it's sheer beauty.

Location: Easton
Submitted by neef
(2018-09-04T04:13:42.681-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
Tree proved to be invasive in our state.
Irina
(Thu Sep 06 15:30:48 PDT 2018)

Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
That was my first guess believe it or not, but the bark was hard as a rock. I guess cork trees aren't always spongy to touch.
neef
(Thu Sep 06 16:17:58 PDT 2018)

Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
The one that has bark without the cork layer (not spongy) and leaves without cilia along margin must be Phellodendron sachalinense--Sakhalin corktree, which is sometimes not recognized and included with P. amurense in the broad sense. These are the two most common in cultivation, but there are more species: P. chinense, japonicum, etc.
Irina
(Sat Sep 08 07:26:25 PDT 2018)


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Gigantic Park Tree

Location: Easton
Submitted by neef
(2018-09-03T18:31:51.91-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:


Having trouble uploading more images...
neef
(Tue Sep 04 04:12:41 PDT 2018)

Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
Invasive tree from East Asia (China, Russian Far East)
Irina
(Thu Sep 06 15:29:38 PDT 2018)


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Is this Cyperus esculentus?

Location: Lower Coonamessett River Falmouth MA
Submitted by Douglas Roberson
(2018-08-29T10:44:36.34-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Cyperus strigosus (straw-colored flatsedge)
Doug, it looks more like C. strigosus to me, because it doesn't have rhizomes ending with tubers. The stem origin is obscured, but could be swollen, like in C. strigosus, and floral scales are long and narrow (they are up to 4.5 mm long in C. strigosus and only 2-3 mm in C. esculentus).
irina
(Wed Aug 29 16:43:10 PDT 2018)

Cyperus strigosus (straw-colored flatsedge)
OK, thanks! Good to know.
Doug
(Thu Aug 30 07:49:26 PDT 2018)


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Common Flower

Drawing a blank on this one. I'm pretty sure I posted it before but I couldn't find it.

Location: Cumberland Farms Fields
Submitted by neef
(2018-08-29T07:59:35.781-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Potentilla recta (sulphur cinquefoil)
A non-native cinquefoil
Irina
(Wed Aug 29 16:32:11 PDT 2018)

Potentilla recta (sulphur cinquefoil)
Got it. That's a new one for me. Thanx!
neef
(Wed Aug 29 18:17:03 PDT 2018)


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Is this Purple chokeberry?

Early summer orange leaves, underside lighter color, but not hairy.

Location: 921 Long Pond Rd, Plymouth, MA
Submitted by Lee Pulis
(2018-08-01T04:16:47.196-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Betula lenta (sweet birch, cherry birch, black birch)
Hi Lee, I believe this is cherry birch. You can check by scratching a small twig: see if it has wintergreen smell. Also, many leaves (tho' not all!) of any birch would sit on short shoots in pairs. I think I see one such pair in the photo (those that show autumn color). An easy way to identify chokeberries (Aronia) is to look at the midrib on the UPPER leaf surface. A chokeberry would have very distinctive glands that look like tiny upright prickles all along the midrib. They are just big enough for us to see them without magnification.
Irina
(Wed Aug 01 09:46:10 PDT 2018)

Betula lenta (sweet birch, cherry birch, black birch)
Did a bunch of scratching and sniffing, but alas, no wintergreen smell.
Lee
(Wed Aug 01 12:21:00 PDT 2018)

Amelanchier canadensis (thicket shadbush, eastern serviceberry, juneberry)
Then perhaps Canada shadbush? I actually hesitated between the two.
Irina
(Wed Aug 01 17:26:38 PDT 2018)


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Native?

About 5? tall

Location: Jaye St, Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-07-24T20:29:52.884-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Conyza canadensis (horseweed, hogweed)
This is a native weedy plant, whose more recent Latin name is Erigeron canadensis. It is going to become even taller than now, may grow twice as tall and leggy.
Irina
(Sat Jul 28 09:47:36 PDT 2018)


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Native?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-07-24T20:35:39.244-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Trifolium arvense (rabbit-foot clover)
No, this isn't native, in fact, a rather aggressive alien.
Irina
(Thu Jul 26 05:35:14 PDT 2018)


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Confirmation of Salix cinerea submitted to EDDMaPs

Location: see attached
Submitted by Karen Lombard
(2018-07-16T08:59:29.108-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:


Karen, the image did not go through. Could you try again or else send it to webmaster at salicicola.com
Irina
(Mon Jul 16 12:31:08 PDT 2018)


Submitted file was not an image but PDF file
admin
(Wed Jul 18 15:11:16 PDT 2018)


The photograph of a barkless branch must have been meant to demonstrate ridges on the wood under bark (a diagnostic character), although it is impossible to discern them. There is plenty of gray/rusty willow in this area, so one can confirm, even though the image if out of focus. You can call it anything but "early detection": this willow has been around for some 100 years. However, it is only possible to confirm S. cinerea sensu lato (not specifying ssp. cinerea or ssp. oleifolia = S. atrocinerea).
Irina
(Wed Jul 18 16:53:04 PDT 2018)


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Completely stumped by this strange plant

Hello Irena, Old friend here. We discovered this strange plant growing on the side of an old farm road at "High Ledges", Shelburne Falls (actually at an Audubon Site). The plant was all by itself and was better than 6' in height. It appeared very healthy and unlike anything else. Could it be related to Canadian Snakeroot or some strange invasive?Kind regards, Salvy

Location: Shelburne Falls MA (app. 1300') along old woods road
Submitted by Salvatore Raciti
(2018-07-16T07:00:58.429-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Arctium lappa (great burdock)
Hello Salvy, it's been a while! How are you? I think I recognize your plant: it's a burdock. We have 3 different burdocks in MA, all of them non-native. This one, I believe, is great burdock. Uncommon in eastern MA, it must be much more common in western/central. I understand you captured it in Franklin County, right?
Irina
(Mon Jul 16 12:28:00 PDT 2018)


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Hi Irina, you have such a great website! Can you please help me ID this plant that looks like reeds? Thanks Ivan

Location: Little Herring Pond, Plymouth
Submitted by Ivan Mikolji
(2018-07-11T10:45:47.136-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:


Thanks for praising the site, Ivan! It is impossible for me to tell if this is phragmites or something different, as the resolution is way too low. Can you produce closer views and send them without scaling?
Irina
(Wed Jul 11 15:31:26 PDT 2018)


can I send you the full resolution image to webmaster@salicicola.com ? My email is mikolji@gmail.com
Ivan Mikolji
(Wed Jul 11 20:01:35 PDT 2018)


Yes, please use this address, it is functional.
Irina
(Thu Jul 12 06:08:06 PDT 2018)

Juncus militaris
Bayonet rush (native). Thanks for the images with the better resolution.
Irina
(Fri Jul 13 14:53:49 PDT 2018)


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