WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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What is This Flower?

I thought this was chicory, but I also had someone suggest it was the ornamental Jasione laevis.

Location: Cranberry Road in MSSF
Submitted by neef
(2017-06-25T06:57:46.245-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Jasione montana
Sheep's bit, a new invasive plant in MA spreading along highways and already alarmingly common in some areas of MSSF and generally in the Plymouth/Carver area. It belongs to bellflower family.
Irina
(Sun Jun 25 17:23:33 PDT 2017)

Jasione montana
This photo was taken along Cranberry Rd. in 2007.
Irina
(Sun Jun 25 17:23:40 PDT 2017)


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White Flower ID

Some Rubus species I'm thinking, but that's very accurate. Any ideas? Awesome sight by the way!

Location: Cranberry Road in MSSF
Submitted by neef
(2017-06-25T07:03:52.721-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Rubus hispidus
Seems to be bristly dewberry, a common creeping Rubus, quite tasty when ripe.
Irina
(Sun Jun 25 17:28:19 PDT 2017)


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can you identify this plant?

Location: Sharon,MA
Submitted by Karen
(2017-06-22T14:15:27.962-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:


Sorry, garden plants are outside the topic of this page.
Irina
(Thu Jun 22 15:46:22 PDT 2017)


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name of plant

Location: western mass
Submitted by vincent piepul
(2017-06-19T18:52:27.911-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:


Vincent, so far I can only figure out the family: mint family (Lamiaceae). With these bracts surrounding the spherical flower head, it looks a little bit like bee balm (Monarda), although the flowers are way too short for a Monarda and the whole thing is too hairy. Where did you take the picture? Is this a garden plant?
Irina
(Tue Jun 20 16:46:36 PDT 2017)

Monarda sp.
Yes, this is a monarda. The photo is deceiving because of the beads of moisture on the leaves that reflect the light - I suspect this shot was taken with the flash on. Compare to this monarda bud photo: http://joecostanzaphotography.com/artwork/1218967-Emerging-Monarda-buds.html ID'ing a plant from a photo can be hard since so often there is no context, information about scale, and the color etc can be way off. Says she who ID's plants for an app all the time. all the best, C.L.
C.L.
(Wed Jun 21 14:08:27 PDT 2017)


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What is this? Thanks

Location: Sharon, MA 02067
Submitted by Richard S.
(2017-05-28T11:36:57.965-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Quercus rubra
Richard, this is an oak, most probably red oak, which has been trying to grow without light.
Irina
(Sun May 28 17:21:18 PDT 2017)

Quercus rubra
Thanks. I have lots of Red oak so very likely. Guess noting special. I will leave it for a while and enjoy its vibrant look for now.
Richard S.
(Mon May 29 05:07:48 PDT 2017)

Quercus rubra
If you gently pull it out instead and stick it somewhere in the woods, this would be a better outcome for the oak.
I
(Mon May 29 05:46:32 PDT 2017)

Quercus rubra
and a very unhealthy one...not enough nitrogen in soil
Cricket b lewis
(Tue Jun 20 15:45:32 PDT 2017)


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can you identify this plant?

Location: Sharon,MA
Submitted by Karen
(2017-06-18T17:58:15.188-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:


Tradescantia (most usual one)weedy to my mind
Cricket B Lewis
(Tue Jun 20 15:44:26 PDT 2017)


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What is this? OK to let it spread?

This "carrot looking foliage" plant spreads very fast. Is a very nice groundcover but concerned it is not good to keep around. Identification appreciated.

Location: Sharon, MA 02067
Submitted by Richard S.
(2017-05-30T08:10:36.753-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:


Richard, tough question this time. This could be a few different things, though it does not seem to be anything native. I'd suggest pulling out most of it and leaving a couple for a while just in case. Let it flower, so it's possible to come up with the ID.
Irina
(Tue May 30 10:06:30 PDT 2017)


Right now it's in an area that I think I can control it for now but will keep it contained and not let it spread. Not sure it flowers. Will wait and see and post picture. Really appreciate your assistance. You have helped me a few times and has made a difference.
Richard S.
(Tue May 30 10:36:04 PDT 2017)


Cecily? A weed?
Cricket Blewis
(Tue Jun 20 15:43:37 PDT 2017)


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can you identify this plant?

This plant has blue flowers.

Location: Sharon,MA
Submitted by Karen
(2017-06-18T18:01:07.569-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Tradescantia sp.
Karen, that's a spiderwort. I can't identify it to the species by just looking at the photo. There are three possibilities: smooth spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis, native), Virginia spiderwort (T. virginiana, introduced), or else a rather widespread hybrid of the two.
Irina
(Mon Jun 19 04:48:50 PDT 2017)

Tradescantia sp.
Thank you very much. It is amazing that you can idenify so well from the photos!
Karen
(Mon Jun 19 14:38:33 PDT 2017)


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What is this?

Grows to 12"-15" high. Had one flower under the two leaves

Location: Manomet
Submitted by James W Parks
(2017-05-30T12:56:50.204-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Podophyllum peltatum
Mayapple. Here is its range map. However, it is believed to be mostly non-native in New England: native only in the Berkshires within MA, in one county in CT, and two in VT. Source: Flora of New England (2011) by A. Haines.
Irina
(Tue May 30 15:11:54 PDT 2017)

Podophyllum peltatum
Thanks -- guess we can add Plymouth County to the list
JW Parks
(Thu Jun 01 10:52:34 PDT 2017)

Podophyllum peltatum
No, we can't, because it is only introduced, not native in Plymouth Co.
Irina
(Thu Jun 01 15:03:16 PDT 2017)


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Bark of Viburnum lentago?

Just noticed your request for the bark of what we're saying is Viburnum lentago; here it is

Location: Fresh Pond Cambridge MA
Submitted by Doug Roberson
(2017-05-26T12:28:48.475-07:00)

All uploaded photos (not scaled): [1]

Answer:

Viburnum lentago
Doug, thanks! I've found a photo of V. lentago bark in Symonds' "Tree Identification Book". It does look similar to your photo, but has mostly small plates--no long cracks. It's shown with a ruler, and the diameter is 5.5 inches. This is the only Viburnum that made it into Simonds' "Tree Book" (although it is shown in the "Shrub Book," too).
Irina
(Fri May 26 16:42:15 PDT 2017)


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