WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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What is this?

Location: Plymouth
Submitted by Margaret
(2016-09-03T08:11:23.677-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Dichanthelium sphaerocarpon
This seems to be rosette panic grass, although I cannot see all characters needed for a positive ID. What makes me think this is D. sphaerocarpon is the white leaf margin (it is very narrow, but can be clearly seen when the image is enlarged). This is called cartilaginous margin. The thing I cannot see is how the leaf origin is shaped (if leaves are heart-shaped at base) and the shape and size of spikelets. In any case this is one of Dichanthelium, and all of them are native. D. sphaerocarpon is widespread on sandy soil in E MA.
Irina
(Sat Sep 03 17:08:18 PDT 2016)


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What is this? It has yellow flowers along the stock in the spring.

Location: 6 Ponds, Plymouth
Submitted by Margaret
(2016-09-03T08:21:41.645-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Lysimachia quadrifolia
Whorled loosestrife (native)
I
(Sat Sep 03 16:52:02 PDT 2016)


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What is this?

Location: 6 Ponds, Plymouth
Submitted by Margaret
(2016-09-03T08:24:26.84-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Myrica pensylvanica
Bayberry (it has been recently moved from Myrica to Morella).
Irina
(Sat Sep 03 16:50:40 PDT 2016)


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What is this? The one on the right. Growing in close proximity to my last post.

Location: 6 Ponds, Plymouth
Submitted by Margaret
(2016-09-03T08:27:25.871-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Nyssa sylvatica
Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica), right and bayberry (Myrica or Morella pensylvanica), left
I
(Sat Sep 03 16:49:13 PDT 2016)


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What are these? Two more "volunteers" in an area we are trying to naturalize.

Location:
Submitted by Margaret
(2016-09-03T08:31:22.527-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Prunus serotina
Black cherry (native) on the left and tupelo (also native) on the right.
Irina
(Sat Sep 03 16:46:30 PDT 2016)


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this has leaves like the black cherry - but different bark

Location: North Dartmouth
Submitted by Hamm
(2016-08-28T11:41:29.627-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Prunus serotina
Yes, the bark is different, but the tree seems to be the same. The previous black cherry whose image you posted a couple days ago merely was younger. As black cherry matures, its bark changes tremendously: it acquires the dark-colored rough bark for which it has been named.
Irina
(Sun Aug 28 12:52:35 PDT 2016)


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crabapple? Has pink flowers in May but no fruit

Location: North Dartmouth
Submitted by Hamm
(2016-08-28T11:46:15.156-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Prunus sargentii
This is one of non-native ornamental cherries, most probably the Japanese Sargent cherry. I knew that it's not a crab, because it has glands on petioles near leaf blades, and this is what all cherries have in common. Its sharply serrate leaf margin and a large size makes me further come to Sargent cherry.
Irina
(Sun Aug 28 12:44:46 PDT 2016)


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wondering what kind of oak?

Location: North Dartmouth
Submitted by Hamm
(2016-08-28T11:47:59.65-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:


It's impossible for me to tell, because the view is too general. Need a few leaves and bark close-up view.
Irina
(Sun Aug 28 12:29:51 PDT 2016)


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Is this a Norway or other maple?

Location: North Dartmouth
Submitted by Hamm
(2016-08-28T11:38:42.188-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:


This is not sugar maple, because the bark is very tight, not exfoliating. The usual alternative is Norway. Need to see bark close up and leaves for a positive ID.
Irina
(Sun Aug 28 12:27:58 PDT 2016)


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get rid of or keep?

Location: North Dartmouth
Submitted by Hamm
(2016-08-24T10:22:50.6-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Rhododendron sp.
This is a non-native but harmless rhododendron (it won't spread); the other photo does not belong to this question, am not sure what that one is, need more views.
Irina
(Wed Aug 24 12:22:34 PDT 2016)


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