WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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How about this little guy?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F.
(2017-08-27T08:39:51.67-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Bidens frondosa
This is some beggar-ticks. There are many species, mostly native. I can try and guess the species, because the leaves are pinnately compound. I am suggesting the most common species of those that have such leaves, although flowers and fruits are needed for a confident ID. This plant has not yet flowered. It flowers in September, and the fruits are produced in October. They are those little black two-teeth forks that stick to our pants and dogs' fur. The common name of this species is devil's pitchforks. It's native.
Irina
(Sun Aug 27 17:46:47 PDT 2017)

Bidens frondosa (beggar-ticks)
Yes, you can look at previous entries. Under the title, there is a link [Previous Entries]. By clicking on it, you can go backwards as far as you wish. So I found that entry (August of last year), but I could not identify it to species then, either. It was only a guess. There are many beggar-ticks, and more characters (close-up fruit view) are needed for this.
Irina
(Wed Jun 06 15:02:24 PDT 2018)


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Star flower?

These were everywhere Saturday

Location: East Head Loop, MSSF
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-06-06T12:04:58.679-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Trientalis borealis (American starflower)
Yes, that's what it is.
Irina
(Wed Jun 06 14:54:10 PDT 2018)


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Native?

What is this? Approximately a half dozen appeared with a couple of square yards.

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-06-01T05:40:00.015-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Rumex crispus (curly dock)
This is another non-native invasive plant from Eurasia.
Irina
(Fri Jun 01 08:46:49 PDT 2018)

Rumex crispus (curly dock)
I've removed them. Thanks to you I got to them just before they went to seed.
Sandy
(Mon Jun 04 10:48:43 PDT 2018)


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What is this flowering tree?

Location: Carver/Plymouth, MA
Submitted by Ellen
(2018-06-03T12:05:15.706-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Prunus serotina (black cherry)
One of two native bird-cherries, black cherry can become a large tree, yet most often we see them as shrubs or small trees. The Latin epithet 'serotina' means 'late': it flowers much later than other cherries and after the leaves are fully expanded (while many cherries flower before leaves). Is has suffered from black knot fungus and tent caterpillars.
Irina
(Sun Jun 03 14:15:37 PDT 2018)


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Hideous Weed

This is all over my lawn. lol It's not going anywhere because I hate weedkiller so I might as well learn what it is. Thanks!

Location: My Lawn...
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-02T10:00:50.417-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Trifolium agrarium (golden clover, palmate clover)
Otherwise, Trifolium campestre, low hop-clover. To identify it to the species, consider the length of the stalk (petiolule) in the central of the three leaflets (it is not visible in the photo). If the central leaflet is on a very short stalk, not longer than those of the two lateral leaflets, then this is T. agrarium; if the central stalk is longer than the lateral, then T. campestre. None of the clovers are native. It must have been sown to your lawn.
Irina
(Sat Jun 02 12:55:49 PDT 2018)


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Native Rockrose?

I'd never seen it flower before; how exquisite!

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-06-01T05:38:28.015-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Helianthemum canadense (longbranch frostweed)
Yes, Canada rockrose or long-branched frostweed, whose more recently used Latin name is Crocanthemum canadense. The petals seem to be distorted/damaged while in the bud. This is often the case with this species. I don't know the cause. The large solitary flower is the first to open. Right now it is on top of the plant; later on, it'll find itself at the origin of two new developing branches, which produce multiple smaller flowers without petals. These flowers don't even open and fertilize inside, each on its own (cleistogamous). Both chasmogamous ("normal," petaliferous) and cleistogamous flowers are productive (set seed).
Irina
(Fri Jun 01 08:50:22 PDT 2018)


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Any idea what this is?

Location: Easton
Submitted by Joe
(2018-05-31T18:57:15.604-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Moluccella laevis
Shell flower, a cultivated plant from Caucasus/Turkey area. Reminder: this page is not meant for cultivated plants.
Irina
(Fri Jun 01 04:20:32 PDT 2018)


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Wavy Milkweed, I hope?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T18:48:35.847-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Solidago sp.
Looks like some goldenrod to me.
Irina
(Wed May 30 04:49:49 PDT 2018)

Solidago sp.
I hope some of the wavy-leaved milkweed survived the winter, I'll keep looking :)
Sandy F
(Wed May 30 12:32:20 PDT 2018)

Solidago sp.
Young wavy-leaved milkweed looks like this
Irina
(Wed May 30 13:51:17 PDT 2018)

Solidago sp.
Thank you! Looks very different from the images I'd been able to find, which were all adult plants. Very helpful!
Sandy
(Wed May 30 21:16:59 PDT 2018)


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Native?

These are very flat

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T11:05:16.383-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Veronica serpyllifolia (thyme-leaf speedwell)
There are two subspecies, one native, the other introduced from Europe, and of course we see the introduced one all the time and never find the native one (which should have flowers of darker blue color and without visible lines). Yours is certainly the introduced one.
Irina
(Tue May 29 12:14:32 PDT 2018)

Veronica serpyllifolia (thyme-leaf speedwell)
Too bad! The flowers are pretty, if tiny.
Sandy
(Tue May 29 12:31:02 PDT 2018)

Veronica serpyllifolia (thyme-leaf speedwell)
Confirmed
Irina
(Wed May 30 05:59:02 PDT 2018)


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Native?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T11:15:50.934-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3] [4]

Answer:

Cerastium fontanum ssp. vulgare (common mouse-ear chickweed)
Most probably this chickweed or else another species, non-native anyway. Minute detail needed to properly identify to species. A native chickweed is very unlikely (native species occur in undisturbed settings, mostly in western MA).
Irina
(Tue May 29 12:07:38 PDT 2018)

Stellaria media (common chickweed)
I think i misinterpreted this one. It looks more like common chickweed. Coming from Europe, just the same.
Irina
(Wed May 30 05:57:53 PDT 2018)


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