WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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White Flower

Another disturbed soil flower. Thanks!

Location: Cumberland Farms Fields
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-20T16:52:06.956-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Rubus allegheniensis (Allegheny blackberry, common blackberry)
If you call herbaceous plants flowers, then this is not a "flower": it's semi-woody.
Irina
(Thu Jun 21 04:42:15 PDT 2018)


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Loan Daisy

Bird's Foit Trefoil next this one, but this simple daisy has me baffled because it's not a Black-Eyed Susan. lol

Location: Cumberland Farms Fields
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-20T16:53:21.596-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Leucanthemum vulgare (oxeye daisy)
A daisy from Europe.
Irina
(Thu Jun 21 04:38:59 PDT 2018)


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Native? May be several plants from clump of seeds

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T18:34:41.345-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Bidens vulgata (tall beggar-ticks)
This must be one of beggar-ticks; most of them would not survive in a backyard or front lawn, as they are obligate wetland plants. There is only one, as far as I have seen, that can easily jump to roadsides, lawns, etc. This is tall beggar-ticks. It's believed to be native. This is an annual that can grow to 1.5 m, according to manuals. I once measured one that was 2.4 meters tall!
Irina
(Thu May 31 05:07:58 PDT 2018)

Bidens vulgata (tall beggar-ticks)
Perhaps these are the same beggar-ticks you id'd last year; I scattered the seed. Would it be possible to view entries from last year again?
Sandy F
(Wed Jun 06 11:58:35 PDT 2018)

Bidens vulgata (tall beggar-ticks)
Yes, it is possible to view previous entries. See below.
Irina
(Wed Jun 06 15:03:42 PDT 2018)

Bidens vulgata (tall beggar-ticks)
There used to be a link called -- previous entries -- one could click on but it is no longer visible from outside of the dashboard.
Sandy
(Wed Jun 20 15:26:16 PDT 2018)


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Similar But Different

A real test here for you.I thought these two weeds were the same, but as I closely inspected I noticed they had different leaves. The flowers are the exact same color but one of them seems to be larger and more "in bloom". I'm thinking Golden Clover and perhaps False Strawberry?

Location: Backyard
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-16T14:07:58.514-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Potentilla argentea (silver cinquefoil)
These two plants have nothing in common. The one on top is one of yellow clovers (Trifolium agrarium, or T. campestre, or else T. dubium). Clovers are from pea family. The one on the bottom, silver cinquefoil is from rose family.
Irina
(Sat Jun 16 15:00:38 PDT 2018)


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Trumpet Like Flower

This was a cool little flower I found somewhere around here, maybe a month ago? It looked like a miniature "Angel's Trumpet" found in some fancier gardens.

Location: SE Mass
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-16T09:33:11.748-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Uvularia sessilifolia (little merrybells)
This plant looked like this long ago, in April/May. Now that the leaves are fully unfolded and the fruit (the former flower) finds itself at the origin of two new branches, it is hard to imagine that this is the same plant. If you click on the name and compare photos taken at different times, you'll see what I am trying to explain.
Irina
(Sat Jun 16 14:49:57 PDT 2018)


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White flowering wild shrub

Location: Southeast MA
Submitted by Charl 402
(2018-06-10T17:52:08.26-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Rosa multiflora (multiflora rose)
Alien invasive rose.
Irina
(Sun Jun 10 20:22:57 PDT 2018)


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Another Common Weed

These are growing on the edge of various parts of my house (this is next to the basketball hoop). I hope this one is at least native.

Location: Yard
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-10T12:51:15.772-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Barbarea vulgaris (yellow rocket)
I am not entirely sure if the plant on the left = plant on the right, but if so, then, alas, it is not native.
Irina
(Sun Jun 10 13:21:42 PDT 2018)

Barbarea vulgaris (yellow rocket)
Is this the same plant as "wild mustard" or just coincidentally in the same family?
neef
(Sun Jun 10 16:31:24 PDT 2018)

Barbarea vulgaris (yellow rocket)
No, this is not wild mustard, but yes, it's in the mustard family.
Irina
(Sun Jun 10 17:14:18 PDT 2018)


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Tree ID

I thought it might be ash, but the alternate branch configuration goes against that theory.

Location: Easton
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-10T12:57:09.013-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Carya tomentosa (mockernut hickory)
The first photo is very nice! You can see scales and hairs on the leaf rachis (axis).
Irina
(Sun Jun 10 13:16:58 PDT 2018)

Carya tomentosa (mockernut hickory)
Cool! I am used to seeing Shagbark and Pignut; I don't think I've found Mockernut around here before. Thank you!
neef
(Sun Jun 10 16:34:51 PDT 2018)


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Honeysuckle?

I'm rusty with everything I learn this time of year. Is this Honeysuckle? If so what kind? Thanks!

Location: Roadside in Bridgewater
Submitted by neef
(2018-06-10T13:05:45.877-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Lonicera morrowii (Morrow's honeysuckle)
Most probably the invasive Morrow honeysuckle.
Irina
(Sun Jun 10 13:18:06 PDT 2018)


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Wondered what kind of plant this was

Has large leaf that looks similar to a sweet gum tree. It is about 3-4? tall. Blooms are about 3? across. I know it is not queen Ann?s lace.

Location: Orange, MA
Submitted by Brenda Berry
(2018-06-07T14:51:22.533-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:


Notes contained special, not allowed characters. Photo not uploaded. If in trouble, send it to webmaster at salicicola.com instead.
admin
(Thu Jun 07 15:03:57 PDT 2018)


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