WILD PLANTS OF EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
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Swamp Milkweed?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T18:53:07.45-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Hieracium sabaudum (Savoy hawkweed, Canada hawkweed)
While it is not possible for me to identify all these rosettes at this stage, I can recognize this one: an invasive hawkweed from Europe, which used to be erroneously called "Canada hawkweed." If you'd like to confirm, watch the hairs on the leaves through a lens. They must be bulbous-based and rather firm.
Irina
(Wed May 30 04:48:54 PDT 2018)


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Native?

There are little spear-shaped protuberances just below the base of each leaf.

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T18:58:04.42-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Prunus sp.
These structures are stipules, and they will soon fall off, because stipules are short-lived in some woody plants including cherries. I believe these are cherry seedlings, maybe even the native black cherry Prunus serotina.
Irina
(Wed May 30 04:39:46 PDT 2018)


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A different cherry?

There are a number of black cherries nearby, but this doesn't have any wool on the midrib

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T18:42:13.345-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:


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Is this native?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T18:38:56.015-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:


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Could these be from some of the native seeds I scattered last fall?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T18:30:20.183-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:


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Native?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-29T10:51:41.24-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Vicia sp.
This must be a young vetch. Can't tell the species, but there isn't a single one native among them. If you'd like to know exactly which species it is, let it mature and flower.
Irina
(Tue May 29 12:28:56 PDT 2018)

Vicia sp.
No need; I'll be removing it!
Sandy
(Tue May 29 12:32:43 PDT 2018)


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Is this native?

Location: Jaye St
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-27T14:42:37.177-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Malus toringo (Toringo crabapple)
This is Japanese crabaple formerly known as Malus sieboldii.
Irina
(Mon May 28 06:04:48 PDT 2018)

Malus toringo (Toringo crabapple)
Thanks!
Sandy F
(Tue May 29 10:40:47 PDT 2018)


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How about this one?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Submitted by Sandy F
(2018-05-27T14:48:20.165-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Hypericum punctatum (spotted St. John's-wort)
This must be a native St.John's wort. There is an introduced look-alike, Hypericum perforatum. That one must have decurrent ridges coming from under the leaves onto the branches, so that the branches look angled. Your plant does not seem have any ridges on the stem (no branches yet)--as far as the resolution permits to see. These two St.John's worts also differ in some characters in the flower.
Irina
(Mon May 28 06:01:19 PDT 2018)


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Plant ID

Here are two better photos. Alternate leaves. I could not find any thorns or prickles. I also think it is a buckthorn except there are no thorns. I don't think it is a crab apple bc it grew so much since last year and apples don't tend to do that. No flowers.

Location: Plymouth
Submitted by Susan n
(2018-05-15T15:19:23.394-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Prunus cerasifera (cherry-plum)
Now that I see the leaf teeth and have your comments, I don't think this is common buckthorn. In buckthorn leaves would be mostly opposite, teeth not as prominent, and besides the leaf shape of the large leaf at the front right (tip) does not match. This might be some exotic cherry, such as Prunus cerasifera. It is known to be present in Massachusetts as a naturalized plant or at least a waif.
Irina
(Fri May 18 16:54:25 PDT 2018)


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What is this small tree/ shrub

Location: Plymouth, MA
Submitted by Susan N
(2018-05-15T06:11:26.726-07:00)

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Rhamnus cathartica (common buckthorn)
As the closeup is out of focus and does not show if the leaves are opposite or alternate, I can only guess: in case the margin has tiny teeth all along, then this could be common buckthorn (an invasive small tree from Europe) or perhaps a crabapple sapling. If you could provide a better closeup and also check if there are any prickles, then perhaps we'd have a better chance.
Irina
(Tue May 15 08:43:08 PDT 2018)


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